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Strokes is a powerful Euclidean drum sequencer, inspired by a real-life master drummer

The latest pattern tool for Ableton Live and Max for Live is a source of complex rhythms, new ideas, and performance tools. And it all started with a good read about a real drummer.

The overload of social media and news means we live in a great time to slow down and read a book. And so even with a load of Max for Live devices out there, our story begins with some in-depth reading by developer John Howes unplugging from the screens and having a proper read.

Jaki Liebezeit: Life, Theory and Practice of a Master Drummer by Jono Podmore, published last month. Hardback and digital editions are still available on the crowd funding page.

The late Jaki Liebezeit was the drummer from German experimental rock band Can. (See obits in The Guardian, Rolling Stone.) Lovers of his work successfully crowd-funded the exhaustive bookJaki Liebezeit: Life, Theory and Practice of a Master Drummer.” (Well, you inspired me to get this, too, John!)

Part of why I love software in music is that it can mirror compositional ideas, the practice of musicianship. So sure enough, while these Max for Live devices aren’t instant “Jacki in a Can” (uh, sorry) – that rock band did spark some investigations of rhythm and pattern in software. And now you can reap the benefits, and see where it takes you.

Euclidean rhythms are nothing new – the basic idea is to spawn somewhat symmetrical patterns mathematically. It’s grown in popularity partly because these symmetries are commonly found in music as diverse as cumbia and Bulgarian folk music. Strokes builds on this idea by conceiving rhythm as a “flow controller” for rhythm – letting you “focus on the overall movement” of patterning in time. You get controls for length, “radius,” “strokes,” and “shift.”

Strokes.

It’s just a really elegant, visual interface for the technique. And by reducing everything to those four controls, there’s space to add channels – a full eight of them, so you can layer really complex polyrhythms.

Preset storage, recall, and morphing is available in both Strokes and Weights.

There are loads of other features, too:

  • On-the-fly controls, including variations and fills (so this is great for performance)
  • Snapshots – store, recall, and crossfade between four, and then create 12 automatic variations
  • Link for repetitive beats, unlink for polyrhythms
  • Pattern automation and modulation, plus MIDI output (which you can then route straight into Ableton Live for later editing and arrangement)
Clock adjustments.

You can also now add accents and swing, and create dotted and triplet rhythms with a custom clock rate selector.

And then there’s Stroke’s companion, Weights. The notion of weights is using the same technique for modulation – 4 buses you can route anywhere, complementing Strokes’ 8 channels of patterns.

Route to a Live parameter, or a VST plug-in – whatever. Inside Weights, you can also shape the modulation signal, modular synthesis fashion – using slew limiters and delays, for instance. And you can again work with snapshots and morphing and use automation and modulation with that.

Modulation routing in Weights.

In other words, these two tools let you turn Ableton Live into a semi-modular powerhouse for exploring polyrhythms, both in musical note/percussion patterns and modulation.

So, uh… whoa.

www.congburn.co.uk/strokes

Strokes is GBP 10 to download. Weights is a GBP 10 add-on; it requires Strokes, so think of it as an expansion pack.

Strokes is GBP 10 to download. Weights is a GBP 10 add-on; it requires Strokes, so think of it as an expansion pack.

If you just want a demo, though, you can grab the simple ‘alpha’ version and try that for free.

Really brilliant stuff – and John has a whole independent Bandcamp label to check out, too, while you’re at it. People making fascinating music and fascinating music tools – something about the times we live in.

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SoundCloud mobile app is now an equal citizen – including enabling uploads

SoundCloud have been gradually adding or restoring features to mobile users – and now uploading is available on iOS (and soon, Android).

I remember at some point, the fear of things like instant SoundCloud uploads was that users would dump a ton of horrible music on the service. But that really misses the point of a lot of why a lot of people presumably want this. (Well, plus, horrible music is not really something that can be avoided – let’s focus on where the good stuff goes.)

Uploads

Let’s say you’re working on a project on the go, and want to send a bounce to a friend or a client. Or you’ve recorded some interviews, and you share with someone doing transcriptions. Oddly, the original purpose of SoundCloud when it launched eons ago was stuff like this – it was an escape from what was at the time using FTP and other draconian solutions.

Here’s how it works:

Uploads are now in the release of the SoundCloud app that’s out today for iOS; we’re waiting on an Android version.

But even if you don’t use that, SoundCloud have been fixing other features.

Track and profile management

January updates on iOS added other missing, oft-requested features – the ability to edit tracks, the ability to edit your profile, and the ability to change what’s in your Spotlight.

This stuff is really invaluable. I can’t count the number of times I bounced a master, sent it to someone via SoundCloud (so they had a quick player, which they don’t get if I use WeTransfer, for instance), and then needed to make an edit.

I’ve already been using this from essentially the day it came out. It’s not in the main SoundCloud app on Android yet, but was delivered at some point on SoundCloud Pulse, the creator-side app. (I just tried to check version history, but it’s fairly impossible to find. I do remember the SoundCloud app and Pulse app being frustrating when they both lacked this.)

You can’t upload from it, but Pulse does let you edit tracks, as here on Android. Sorry, real screenshot, real dumb working track title.

The same is true of managing your profile and spotlight. With so many platforms to juggle, and many of them (cough, Facebook) a total pain, the ability to quickly tweak your profile or what’s in your spotlight while you’re waiting for a bus is great.

(Note – waiting for a bus. Please don’t do this on the toilet. Gross.)

I’ve asked SoundCloud to let us know when to expect this on Android, and what the added features on the SoundCloud app itself mean for the Pulse app.

For now, Pulse remains useful for keeping tabs on interactions from other users and looking at stats.

SoundCloud hasn’t had the pace of innovation that marked its early years – nor, for that matter, would we say that I think of most of the social platforms we now use online. So I do suspect we’ll continue to hear some user gripes about the brand, particularly when we shell out money each month. On the other hand, some of that innovation was even more disruptive – like the removal of groups. I’m keen to hear more from what our neighbors in Berlin are up to, and whether it can serve what producers really want.

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Bionic synthesis: artists make music with a prosthetic arm, eye motion

Accessibility in music can mean expanding expression beyond what is normally physically possible. For one artist, that means jacking a prosthesis as CV – for another, overcoming paralysis to make music with eyes alone.

Bertolt Meyer was already producing and DJing, even with a birth condition that left him without the lower portion of one arm. But he hacked his arm prosthesis to jack control voltage straight into his modular – connecting to synthesis more directly than most before would even imagine.

In the case of Pone, a seminal French hip-hop producer, the disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) left the artist without muscle control of his body. Using an eye interface, he has managed to publish a book on the disease.

But he has also turned to music production, connecting open, hackable eye tracking solutions to Ableton Live. The eyes act as a (very slow) mouse – in this case, the screen-and-pointer GUI paradigm of the software is an aid to accessibility. Inspired by Kate Bush, he has made an instrumental album called Kate & Me entirely using his eyes.

And … wow – it’s everything you’d expect from a hip-hop innovator like Pone, astonishing as you think of the effort that went into production. It’s a testament to the power of musical imagination, and the potential of that imagination to connect in any way it can with the outside world.

The album is a free download from the album site:

Check the release party:

The Guardian has an extensive article on his story. There’s some sobering information, too – like the lack of French insurance support for the condition.

Pone: the paralysed producer making music with his eyes [The Guardian]

There’s not nearly enough attention paid to accessibility in the music tech industry. It’s not some novel edge case – it hits right at the core of what music technology for expression is fundamentally about. (And even accessibility defined in narrow terms is bigger than you think – so for instance 1 in 20 KOMPLETE KONTROL users take advantage of features for the visually impaired.)

I wrote about this in a blog story for Native Instruments, which deals with their products but also a lot about the process for developing these features – it’s relevant to anyone reading here who makes music products. (And even though this deals with vision accessibility, there are lessons relevant to other matters, too.)

Designing for the visually impaired

It’s also worth reading Ashley Elsdon’s writing on the topic, like this story for us:

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Bandcamp is an ecosystem; this guide explains how that can help your music grow

Bandcamp can work best when you’re both an artist and a fan on the platform. And if you care about actually connected with people, that’s a big deal.

I’ve again teamed up with Riemann Kollektion to develop free tutorial material. It’s pretty fitting I think that this falls on Valentine’s Day. I remember a favorite grade school ritual was getting a shoebox and then spreading as many cute affectionate notecards to everyone in the class. (Definitely, you wanted some candy taped to it for bonus points.)

That’s totally the idea here – rather than being beholden to uncaring algorithms, corporate overlords, and banal charts, we can find some audience for our music by sharing the love.

Of course, to do that, you have to first navigate Bandcamp’s interface – both as a fan and as an artist. Here’s the guide to doing that:

Bandcamp can save us all over again [Guide] riemannkollektion.com

A complete set of power instructions for de-tangling its interface and finding love as a producer.

Riemann and Florian Meindl are really using Bandcamp effectively – even including a subscription to sounds.

riemannkollektion.bandcamp.com/

florianmeindl.bandcamp.com/

So there’s a business model here that is built around what artists and labels need – where you retain control, can offer flexible purchase options, and can make enough money and retain data to run as a business. But it’s not just that, I think, but the chance to participate in a larger community and ecosystem that is making Bandcamp so effective, even for weirder genres and artists that would otherwise get lost.

To sum up that larger ecosystem ethos, I see a few major points:

  • High-quality media files in an environment the artist/ label can actually control
  • An ownership-oriented (rather than rental-oriented) site and accompanying community (the people who like buying downloads and tapes and vinyl and merch)
  • Network-effect spread of music via a rich, supportive community, which in turn supports –
  • Music discovery via human editorial and individual users
Following, endorsements/reviews, email lists, the Feed, and even discovering music via individual users – the more you use Bandcamp, the more you start to appreciate what it can be. It feels good to feel good about online music again.

You know, other sites could learn from these things. But they’re built to maximize growth and revenue sharing at the top, not to best support human-to-human interactions around music. And that’s why the music landscape is so miserable right now for so many people, in a nutshell.

So all the little details of the Feed, “supported by” testimonials, mailing lists, and players that can be easily shared on other platforms — all of this adds up.

I talk about how to make the best use of that in this guide, and I hope we’ll dig deeper into getting a lot out of Bandcamp in the future.

You can find my music and – just as importantly, my beloved collection – on Bandcamp. (Artist page / fan page) I hope to follow some of you, too.

But do let me know what you think of the guide, as Florian and I hope to revise this and follow up with possibly more installments.

Bandcamp can save us all over again [Guide]

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Prototypes are free, open-source plug-ins – use them for sound, or to learn Csound

Get a free algorithmic bass drum generator, a lo-fi modulator, a massive granular workstation, for free – and that’s just the beginning.

Micah Frank is one of the most prolific sound designer-inventor-composer types around, via his Puremagnetik soundware label and personal projects. Lately, he’s been turning some of these larger, more experimental projects into free tools that you can both use in your own music – and learn from and expand.

Last summer, we saw an expansive, unparalleled granular tool take form as both album and free code:

But now, Micah has gone further – way further. The new series is a set of plug-ins called Prototypes. That granular instrument from last summer has become what is really a full-fledged tool like no other, and now is available in plug-in form. There are new tools in a slightly more pre-release state, true to the “prototype” name. But all are ready to use – and they offer a window into the power of Csound, the fully free and open-source omni-platform sound toolkit that is descended the very first digital audio tools ever created.

Available already:

Kickblast (an algorithmic bass drum generator)

Parallel (a lo-fi modulator)

And a much developed (not so prototype-ish) plugin version of my multitrack granular workstation Grainstation C

Pre-built plug-ins for VST and Audio Unit are available for macOS and 64-bit Windows. I think it’s trivial to build for some other platforms (I need to check that out), or you can also run in Csound directly. Find those in the Builds section of his GitHub:

github.com/micah-frank-studio/Prototypes/tree/master/Builds

It’s all open-source (GNU GPLv2 license), and while you can run it as a plug-in, the sound code is all in Csound. Full repository:

github.com/micah-frank-studio/Prototypes

Micah tells CDM he hopes that some of you will discover what Csound can do in your own work. ” Csound is my favorite,” Micah says. The “spectral, granular, convolution sound” is one of the best available, he raves. “I feel like it needs an awareness push, as the music-making community is much more ready to code than they were in the ’80s. And the learning curve from Max (or even a modular system) to Csound is not so bad.”

Noted.

Follow Micah on Instagram, so you get some pretty nature shots interspersed with your music nerd goodness. My kind of influencer.

www.instagram.com/micah.frank.studio/

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Someone made a Pomodoro timer for Ableton Live, so you can stay productive, take breaks

Productivity engineering has come to music production. A popular method for timeboxing is now available as a free Live add-on.

Have you ever sighed in relief to have a big, uninterrupted span of time – only to wind up wiling it all away with procrastination? And then have you found yourself with a particular deadline – like an hour left in your music studio before your partner arrives to kick you out – and suddenly find you’re focused?

The basic principle here is that, paradoxically, even as we hate schedules and deadlines, constraints can help us focus. By constraining our time, or timeboxing, we can concentrate more easily on a particular task.

The Pomodoro Technique is this boiled down to a really simple cycle. It’s named for a kitchen timer – you know, the thing often called an egg timer because it’s shaped like an egg, but in this case apparently with a model shaped like a tomato. It’s the late-80s invention of Francesco Cirillo, who I understand even liked the ticking sound. I hate ticking – uh, especially while making music – but sometimes setting a timer can make it easier to tackle a task you’re putting off.

While invented in the late 80s, Pomodoro Technique has spread more widely in the productivity craze of the Internet age. Of course, there’s a Lifehacker guide to getting started. (It was even updated as recently as last summer.) And yes, Francesco is around and will gladly take your money.

Now, it may seem a little strange to do this when you’re working on music, which most of us think of as a diversion. Isn’t music supposed to be endlessly fun and something we can concentrate on without any challenge? But apart from more rote work or making a Max for Live patch or carefully editing envelopes, anything that requires you to focus your brain benefits from breaks.

And that’s really what the Pomodoro Technique is about. It’s not actually the 25 minutes of focus that is the most important. It’s the break. (Perhaps part of why you’re so eager to procrastinate is a legitimate impulse by your brain that you’re overly and unnaturally focused on something.)

There’s plenty of science to back this up. Selecting just one useful overview:

Brief diversions vastly improve focus, researchers find [ScienceDaily summary; original paper in Cognition, 2001]

There are lots and lots of Pomodoro-themed timers out there – or you can use any timer (as on your phone, wristwatch, a physical egg timer, whatever). (The Pomodoro timers sometimes have special features dedicated to the technique, and at least pictures of tomatoes, which as a fan of the veget— erm, fruit – I enjoy.)

pATCHES, a site and Patreon subscription creating resources for producers, has an experimental Max for Live plug-in. Apart from letting you run the thing inside your session, it even stops your transport when you’re due for a break – if you find that useful.

patches.zone/max-for-live/pomodoro

I’m curious to hear if people find this useful. It is easy to forget that, as much as we mystify music process, what we’re really taking care of is our brain.

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In quarantined China, concerts are going online as a safe place to meet

Even in the capital Beijing, once-crowded streets are now empty, as the 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak forces people at home. The solution for live musicians: turn to streaming.

Streaming was already a popular hangout for Chinese musicians and artists across the region, before the viral shutdown of public space. That already included experimental artists looking to reach one another in their niche. The difference is, now online interaction in China is essential because people are effectively all isolated at home.

I caught some small window into this via Edward Sanderson, based in Beijing, who has been sharing the streams of his friends. (To this I’m again indebted to C-drik and his Syrphe Facebook group on experimental music in Asia and Africa, as I wrote up recently.)

Edward writes, ” As group events in China have been curtailed because of the coronavirus threat, the online space has become more important for meeting up.” (Many of these events are also shared via Facebook even though that site is blocked by default in China; in experimental music circles, it seems VPNs are popular.)

So, for instance, via streaming, two experimental clarinetists can play together.

Zhu Wenbo played a concert from his home in Beijing:

In Dali, located in the southwestern Chinese province of Yunnan, clarinet player Ding Chenchen could join in a day later, as a duet:

You won’t see anything until a stream is active, but there’s a streaming space on Shanghai-based Bilili, with a URL like this one:

space.bilibili.com/505035552/

That’s a Chinese-only service that now boasts tens of millions of users, largely focused around games, animation, and comics, but evidently branching out into clarinet noise music. Artist Zhao Cong had announced a stream for today. I couldn’t locate it in time for this post, but here are some of her gorgeous textural compositions on Bandcamp – engrossingly fuzzy, lo-fi looped constructions:

Plus as part of the “Practice” series, new live-streamed performances were just announced with music by Zhu Wenbo, Zhou Yi, and Li Song (Chinese-language link, but you can get QR codes for concerts coming up in the next week):

mp.weixin.qq.com/s/opP6L9YTtevuRtwvjchpTg?fbclid=IwAR3qgeJNGXj0DmT6YLCeZtxqxXcJw8wJUjR1Fxubvfwo9gWvDCUtryXGH9I

Instead of links, event promos heavily feature images, and even QR codes. The number below Bilibili represents a “space” on the streaming site; head there at the appointed time, and you get live-streamed music. So think more underground – less Facebook notifications from the Boiler Room page everybody and their dog subscribes to.

Just as China has led the way in expanding the uses of mobile chat, mobile-based streaming has taken off in the country even as the West embraces the tech in fits and starts. (I’d say the reason is, markets like the USA still split usage between desktop and mobile, and are dominated by Facebook and Google and their business models – including for how music fees are structured.)

Anyway, our Chinese readers now far more about all of this than I do (from streaming to the current state of Chinese quarantine). So, since we do have a large readership that’s now trapped in your houses –

Open call to Chinese artists and other readers under quarantine! If you do have some ideas for streaming concerts, go for it! I’ll be happy to share that across the readership here. We can basically create, for now, not Boiler Room, but a sort of Coronavirus Room for bored and isolated quarantined musicians.

And to everyone dealing with life in the shadow of this virus, we wish you the best health. A big thanks to all the people working to contain its spread and doing research to help humans respond in ways that are well-informed and effective. I am not an immunologist and I don’t know that I would make a very good one, but what I imagine we can do as musicians is to help share accurate information across communities, bring people together, and to process emotions.

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The Wall of Sound reimagines a sampler-sequencer for public space and use

In an oversized, lo-fi electronic sound instrument, the project from Warszawa, PL’s panGenerator lets the public collaborate on sonic graffiti.

The Wall of Sound was commissioned by the group for Katowice Street Art 2019: Urban Sound, in the south of Poland. It’s a big web of hexagonal nodes, each with small controls and description so you can record sound, then sequence its playback.

The components will be familiar to anyone working with DIY electronics – some ATmega 328 (in the nodes), some ATTiny for the links, and “some cheap sound recording / playback chips that are giving the whole thing a lo-fi vibe.” Actually, maybe the independence of all those nodes is the most interesting part – a uniquely lo-fi modular.

Curators: Piotr Ceglarek / Zuzanna Waltoś from Biuro Dźwięku Katowice. Photos by Maciej Jędrzejewski.

More:

The Wall of Sound

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The latest attempt to make digital music tangible: NFC-powered Muse Blocks

We are living in an immaterial world. Muse Blocks, tiles with embedded NFC chips, are one idea, and now team up with a popular electronic music label.

Berlin-based Senic, a hardware startup focused on smart home solutions, devised the tangible product Muse Blocks. And they’ve recruited underground tech house label Katermukke, Dirty Doering’s label, which has its own grungy Berlin afterhours vibes – fitting to its home base of the Kater Blau nightclub.

Launch video (German with English subtitles):

Basically, you can think of these tiles as connected art objects. Tap them to your phone (provided you have an NFC-capable smartphone), and up pops a streamed album or playlist. You can program the tiles yourself, meaning that you can have a physical object to go with your mixes – so it’s the 21st-century streaming equivalent of a mixtape, in theory.

www.senic.com/en/museblocks#faq

The pricing mirrors what we used to pay for CDs – 15EUR is the “special introductory price.” If you want them to look smart in your living room, you can buy a set that includes a bar to mount to a wall, and 7 Muse Blocks to put up on it, for a 69EUR bundle price. That of course makes them expensive for the promo use case.

Since the music is streamed, these are purely decorative, but then I suppose we buy all sorts of objects that are indeed purely decorative. It changes the streaming experience, at least, in that the ephemeral experience of streamed music gets its own object permanence and spatial location. By default, there’s support for Spotify, Apple Music, SoundCloud, and Tidal, but they also suggest Netflix, YouTube, and more interesting stuff like Apple Homekit and IFTTT.

Uh, so then you can do this. Yes, I see that she’s also tapping her phone almost from the first interaction. Shhh. The design objects still look very cool.

I don’t know if this solves any problems here, but it does at least reframe the ongoing lack of tangibility in streamed music. And so that was obviously the appeal to Katermukke.

Now, if you’re wondering if you could DIY something like this – like maybe you want to release your next streamed album or mix inside a furry toy rabbit or a potted cactus – you can, of course. There are kits available from Identiv, tons of NFC and RFID stuff from Adafruit, and more. The mind boggles, actually, given the amount of stuff in our world constantly transmitting data.

Even on Senic’s devices, you can use a free app to write your own data. It’s certainly more fun, if a lot more expensive, than a cut up paper giveaway, so – yeah, you could absolutely use this for a Bandcamp code if you wanted.

Here’s an example of the write process:

The problem with all of this remains that there’s no actual data on the object, so it is effectively, well, useless. I still wonder what delivery medium makes sense for digital downloads. Most easily-bought USB keys and SD cards are pretty unattractive, and arguably they don’t offer anything that a download link can’t do. CDs are at this point about as dead as a format as cassette tapes and vinyl, but lack the collectability of either of those.

And so… oh, actually, I have nothing to say beyond that. If I come up with a conclusion, maybe I can embed it on an NFC object, and then… uh, never mind.

Let me just go dig up what NFC powers my Huawei phone has. See you.

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Welcome to Hell: the marvelous, mad musical instruments of Ewa Justka

Some people claim electronic music is the work of the devil. Inventor Ewa Justka creates things that could actually prove it.

Ewa is a Glasgow, Scotland UK-based, Polish-born sound artist, musician, and inventor. She can bang her way through a raw techno set, she can blind you wish flashing lights driven by homemade circuits, or she can open a gateway to evil realms in unbridled noise – all of this at festivals like CTM, Unsound, Insomnia, and Sonic Acts. But she also builds fantastic instruments of her own – and you can buy them for your own abuse, or if you’re lucky, catch her at a workshop and make it for yourself.

There’s the Ladder to Hell, a synthesizer. It started as a resonant ladder filter a la Moog, but devolved into something far more distorted and psychotic. There’s a WASP filter in there, too. There are SCREAM and DRIVE knobs that are … not tame. You can input CV to the Moog and Wasp filters – that’s resonance on the Wasp filter, for some real punishment.

Self-oscillate or even make some subtler distorted timbres, too.

It’s as effective as a sound processor as it is as a synth, thanks to an audio input. Check the manual and full specs.

Ladder to Hell at Etsy

Here are some samples of the instrument, which you can buy on Bandcamp, then play on your next dinner date.

ewajustka.bandcamp.com/album/ladder-to-hell-samples

Then there’s the WhOoPsYnTh, a combination sampler + delay + LFO with similarly masochistic sonic possibilities. It’s inspired by the Pete Edwards design for a similar architecture – and Pete, like Ewa, is also someone who builds creations, then takes them into ecstatic noisy performances.

The WhOoPsYnTh just goes all out with that idea, screaming in pain in a very Ewa Justka-ish sonic voice. But the beauty of it is, you can again use external CV – here for delay length. You can cut up sounds and stretch them with the delay. You can really warp audio inputs with this.

More documentation on how to play it soon.

WhOoPsYnTh @ Etsy

My favorite review: “…the Optodeafener is evil, dangerous, exciting, rhythmic and feral. Do not hesitate. “

You can find loads of stuff on the Optotronics site, shipped from Glasgow (she was formerly in London). All of this is painstakingly handmade by the artist, so you get something truly unique.

www.etsy.com/shop/Optotronics?ref=l2-about-shopname

These are elaborate, full instruments, but Ewa can also make dark magic with more economical sets of parts. Meet the VOICE_ODDER 2, a thing that takes inputs and makes them … odd. And makes your neighbors hate … you.

Using light-sensitive wave oscillators and a delay, it’s palm-sized mayhem.

Take a class with Ewa to turn this…
…into this.

You’ll be able to build one of these yourself at an event I’m co-hosting on February 22 in Kaliningrad, Russia, so if you’re nearby – say, Gdansk, or Lithuania, or Minsk, or somewhere like Moscow that has cheap flights – you should come learn these dark arts with us. Sign up for the Facebook event and we’ll tell you how to join the workshop and make one yourself:

Space.Zero Kaliningrad

Thanks to British Embassy in Moscow and the British Council for supporting UK artist Ewa’s Kaliningrad debut, as part of the UK-Russia Year of Music.

More of Ewa – who was also a co-host and a participant in the CTM Festival MusicMakers Hacklab with me.

ewajustka.tumblr.com/

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